Remy® Products Frequently Asked Questions

Below are some of the frequently asked questions we hear from technicians on a regular basis.

Possible causes are a damaged pinion or ring gear, a defective starter or magnetic switch, a defective ignition switch or control circuit.

Possible root causes are a defective drive clutch or a defective starter motor.

Possible root causes are a defective solenoid, a damaged or worn pinion gear or ring gear.

There are a couple of reasons the outboard pad can wear out before the inboard pad.

  1. A weak battery.
  2. Loose or corroded connections.
  3. Defective starter motor.

First, check the battery state of charge.  Clean and tighten connections.  Test the starter and diagnose engine problems.

Unable to start the engine may be caused by any of the following variables:

  • A dead battery
  • Defective fusible link
  • Loose connections
  • Defective ignition switch
  • Defective solenoid
  • Engine problem
  • Problem in the vehicle anti-theft system

Never disconnect a battery cable with the engine running.

Removing a battery cable with the engine running causes voltage spikes which can damage the alternator, computer and other electrical components in your vehicle.

•Make sure you have a good, fully-charged battery.

The starter motor will not work properly with a weak or defective battery. The voltage from the key contact should be a minimum of 9,5V during starting.

•Do not use starter motor for ventilation of diesel motor.

After repairs to the injection system (changing filter, diesel pump, high pressure pipes, etc.). NEVER ventilate by using the starter motor. This can cause overheating of the starter motor especially with gear reduction starters.

Check other components of the starting system.

Perform these steps in the order shown:

  1. Review any additional information sheets
  2. Remove negative battery cable. This prevents accidental shorts during starter replacement.
  3. Charge and load test battery.  A weak or defective battery will cause starting problems.
  4. Remove wire connections from old starter motor. Make a note of each connection for the new starter installation.
  5. Remove fixing bolts.
  6. Remove old starter motor and check condition of starter motor
  7. Check new starter
    Does it have the same mounting holes and connections
    Sometimes starters of different original brands are fitted on one  particular type of car. In spite of the external difference, they are the same in terms of capacity, installation and connection. The reference numbers of these various manufacturers are included in the conversion list in our catalogue.

  1. Install new starter motor
    DOWEL BUSHING
    Install bushing if old starter motor is provided with this bushing.
    Damaged or deformed bushes should be replaced by a new one which is needed for a good alignment of the starter motor. Be careful that the old bushing does not stay in the motorblock.
    OPEN SHAFT UNITS (VW – Audi)
    New bush to be fitted in motorblock
    FIXING BOLTS
    Tighten fixing bolts evenly to prevent bad alignment of the starter motor with the flywheel.

  1. Check installation
    Inspect wiring, connections and fuse links for worn insulation, breaks or corrosion. Repair broken or damaged connections. Make sure all wires have been connected correctly and there are no pinched wires or shorts to ground. Check and clean battery cable connections at battery, framelchassis and engine block. Avoid breaking the plastic solenoid cap by carelessness or over-tightening of the battery cable.
  2. Connect negative battery cable LAST
  3. Start engine
    Check voltage on solenoid contact 50 (key contact) during starting. This should be minimum 9,5 Volt. If necessary the voltage can be increased by installing an auxiliary solenoid (see diagram). The “click-click” noise when starting usually indicates this shortage of voltage.
  4. Double check your work.  STOP engine and recheck fixing bolts and wire connections.

Check for proper voltage on vehicle

  1. Install starter and fasten all electrical connections securely.

  2. Connect a voltmeter to the starter as follows.Black lead to starter case; red lead to “S” terminal.Attempt to crank engine.

    NO CRANK – VOLTAGE LESS THAN 12 VOLTS:

    If the engine does not crank and voltage is less than 12.0 volts, check for defective neutral safety switch, bad ignition switch, weak battery or poor ground.

    NO CRANK – VOLTAGE MORE THAN 12 VOLTS:

    If the engine does not crank and voltage is MORE than 12.0 volts, proceed to step C.

  3. Move red wire of voltmeter to starter BAT post.

  4. Turn the ignition key to the crank position.

  5. Observe the voltmeter:

    NO CRANK – VOLTAGE LESS THAN 12 VOLTS:

    Check for weak battery, loose or corroded cables

    CRANKS – VOLTAGE LESS THAN 9 VOLTS:

    Cranking at less than 9 volts will damage the starter. This condition must be corrected to prevent a repeat failure.  Check for weak battery, loose or corroded cables.

Never disconnect a battery cable with the engine running.

Removing a battery cable with the engine running causes voltage spikes which can damage the alternator, ECU and other electrical components in your vehicle.

Make sure you have a good, fully-charged battery.

Your alternator is not designed to recharge a weak or defective battery and may be damaged by doing so. Charge and load test battery prior to alternator installation.

Do not overload the alternator.

Retro-fit high power stereo’s, fog and driving lights, or other devices may exceed the capacity of the alternator, causing premature failure.

If the instrument panel or gauge indicates a problem, a voltmeter can be used to isolate faulty components in the charging systems. If you do not have the equipment or skills necessary to perform these tests, your alternator supplier can test your system, recommend a local facility to do so.

USE EXTREME CAUTION WHEN WORKING AROUND AN OPERATING VEHICLE ENGINE.

Perform ALL of the following tests with the ENGINE RUNNING at 2000 RPM with LIGHTS and HEATER FAN ON.

  • Voltage Test:
    Measure from the POSITIVE BATTERY POST to the NEGATIVE BATTERY POST. A good reading is BETWEEN 13.0 AND 15.3 VOLTS.
    A higher reading may indicate a bad regulator. Do not operate vehicle if reading is higher than 15.3 volts. If the reading is lower than 13.0 volts, check the following: BATTERY: A weak or defective battery will cause other charging system components to appear faulty. BELTS: loose, worn, cracked or glazed belts will slip and cause low output from the alternator.

  • Negative battery cables and connections
    Connections from the battery to the frame / chassis and engine block must be clean, tight and corrosion free. To verify, measure from the ALTERNATOR CASE to the NEGATIVE BATTERY POST. A reading higher than 0.25 volts indicates a problem with the negative battery cable or connections to frame / chassis engine block.

  • Positive battery cables and connections
    The connections from the positive battery post to the alternator output, including positive cable, fusible link and alternator output wire, should be clean and tight.
    To verify, measure from the ALTERNATOR OUTPUT TERMINAL to the POSITIVE BATTERY POST. A reading higher than 0.35 volts indicates a problem with the positive battery terminal to alternator fuse block connections. If the reading is higher than 0.75 volts, look for blown fuses, swollen or discoloured fusible links or an open wire.

Perform these steps in the order shown:

  1. Review any additional technical bulletins supplied with this unit
  2. Remove negative battery cable This prevents accidental shorts during alternator replacement.
  3. Charge and load test battery. A weak or defective battery will damage your new alternator.
  4. Remove wire connections from old alternator. Make a note of each connection for the new alternator installation.
  5. Remove old alternator
    MANUAL BELT TENSIONERS
    Remove adjusting ear bolt. Remove belt(s). Then, remove pivot bolt.
    AUTOMATIC TENSIONERS
    Remove belt first using proper tool to relieve belt tension. Belt will slip off. Remove mounting bolts. Save hardware for installation of new unit.
  6. Make sure the pulley on the new and old unit match.  If necessary, exchange pulleys, noting spacer and washer locations. NEVER use V belts on serpentine pulleys or serpentine belts on V- pulleys. Always count the grooves in serpentine pulleys to assure an exact match. If you change the pulley, use a torkque ranch and a ring spanner to ensure pulley nut is tight.
  7. Install new starter motor
    INSPECT BELTS
    Inspect belts for wear, cracks and glazing and replace, if necessary. On some vehicles, it may be easier to attach wiring before attaching mounting bolts. Do not overtighten electrical connections.
    MANUAL TENSIONING
    Alternators - Installation
    Install mounting bolts loosely so belt can be adjusted. Position belts on pulleys. Apply leverage to alternator front housing only (end closest to pulley) until belt tension meets vehicle specifications. Tighten mounting bolts. Typically, belts will deflect approx. 3/8” to 1/2” when pressed midway between the two farthest pulleys. The tension on a new V-belt should be checked and reset after 15 minutes of operation.
    AUTOMATIC TENSIONS
    Install all alternator mounting bolts finger tight. Use proper tool to release tension and route belt around pulleys. Allow tensioner to tighten belt.
  8. Check installation
    Inspect wiring, connections and fuse links for worn insulation, breaks or corrosion. Repair broken or damaged connections. Make sure all wires have been connected correctly and there are no pinched wires or shorts to earth. Check and clean battery cable connections at battery, frame/chassis and engine block.
  9. Connect negative battery cable last
  10. Start engine
    Check charging system light or gauge on instrument panel for proper system operation. Let engine idle for 10 minutes to allow voltage to stabilize. Refer to troubleshooting section if you have any problems or want to perform more detailed system tests.
    DO NOT DISCONNECT ANY WIRING WHILST ENGINE IS RUNNING
  11. Double check your work
    STOP engine, verify belt tension and recheck mounting bolts.